This page was updated on Feb. 11, 2021.

  1. Is there public health guidance available for the 20-21 school year? (updated 12/11/20)
  2. What about public health guidance to prevent the virus from entering the schools? (8/13/20)
  3. What guidance is available for individuals who are confirmed or suspected with COVID-19? (updated 9/2/20)
  4. What about guidance for individuals who are in close contact to individuals who tested positive? (updated 12/11/20)
  5. What kind of reporting requirements are there for test-confirmed cases of COVID-19? (updated 10/2/20)
  6. Is TEA making COVID-19 testing available in schools? (updated 12/18/20)
  7. What determines a school district’s test distribution allotment? (updated 2/11/21)
  8. If my school system is in a region with a high hospitalization rate, will we get more tests? (11/5/20)
  9. How long is this testing program slated to run? (updated 2/11/21)
  10. What additional information is there about the BinaxNow tests that the state is using? (11/5/20)
  11. Who is eligible to be tested using the BinaxNow test? (updated 11/6/20)
  12. What are the recommended testing approaches for the COVID-19 testing program? (updated 12/18/20)
  13. Who administers the tests? (11/5/20)
  14. What is the process for students and staff to be tested? (11/5/20)
  15. What reporting requirements are there for these tests? (updated 2/11/21)
  16. Is there information on eligibility, cost, and administration of COVID-19 vaccines? (1/12/21)
  17. Can a school district require an eligible educator to receive the vaccine? (1/12/21)
  18. How are test results further reported? (11/5/20)
  19. Is there guidance on masks/face coverings? (8/13/20)
  20. How about guidance on social distancing and class size? (8/13/20)
  21. What about visitors to schools? (8/13/20)
  22. What about public health guidance for staffing and meetings? (8/13/20)
  23. Is the state doing anything about Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for students and staff? (8/13/20)
  24. Is there guidance for UIL sports? (8/13/20)
  25. Is there guidance on training and conditioning activities that are non-UIL activities? (8/13/20)

The answers to questions we've compiled do not constitute legal advice. The situation is changing rapidly, and key factors will differ from school district to school district. This information will be updated as new details emerge, but we encourage TCTA members with specific questions to call our staff attorneys at 888-879-8282. Members with general inquiries can submit them through the Ask-a-Lawyer portal.

For more COVID-19 FAQs about 2020-21, click here.

Health Guidance

Is there public health guidance available for the 20-21 school year?

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20) to help support school systems in planning for the 2020-21 school year includes:

  • school systems should consider stringently applying practices to adults on campuses, even when it might not be feasible to do so for students, to more fully protect adult teachers and staff who are generally at greater risk from COVID-19 than students;
  • there will almost certainly be situations that necessitate temporary school closure due to positive COVID-19 cases in schools. Parents, educators, and school administrators should be prepared for this in the event that it occurs, while actively working to prevent it through prevention and mitigation practices;
  • neither the public health guidance nor any local school systems’ reopening plans are subject to approval by any government entity; and
  • TEA recommends that school systems designate a staff person or group that is responsible for responding to COVID-19 concerns and clearly communicate for all school staff and families who this person or group is and how to contact them.

TEA also makes available a Public Health Operations Guidebook that outlines the steps that school systems must take to develop their plans, provides guidelines and a tool for planning with local public health entities, and provides communications resources that school systems and campuses can customize to align to their local plans. The guidebook includes:

  • Resources: scenario planning documents and communications templates to communicate with parents/staff
  • Definitions:
    • Staying home: allows individuals who may have been exposed to COVID-19 to monitor symptoms during the period in which they may be infectious. They should separate themselves from others outside their home, monitor their health, and follow directions from their state or local health entity.
    • Self-isolation is different: individuals who are in isolation should stay home until it’s safe for them to be around others.
  • Beginning of the year notification letters to Parents/Guardians and Staff/Educators
  • Notification of failed screening
  • Mobile and web-based software applications to screen staff, students, and visitors for COVID-19 symptoms. Districts may choose to implement these applications to simplify their screening process. 
  • Flow chart for what to do to respond to confirmed COVID-19 cases and negative cases.

In addition, TEA makes available Tips for Specialized Classrooms for Students with Disabilities Returning from Remote Learning (updated 12/10/20) that provides prevention measures and cleaning procedure recommendations for educators supporting specialized classrooms and students with disabilities who require physical contact and support to meet their needs.

What about public health guidance to prevent the virus from entering the schools?

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20) states that school systems must require teachers and staff to self-screen for COVID-19 symptoms before coming onto campus each day.

In addition, the school systems may consider screening students for COVID-19 as well. Screening is accomplished by asking questions by phone or other electronic methods and/or in person. The screening questions should also be asked of a student’s parent if that parent will be dropping off or picking up their child from inside the school. Regularly performing a forehead temperature check of otherwise asymptomatic students in school is not recommended, but the practice is also not prohibited.

What guidance is available for individuals who are confirmed or suspected with COVID-19?

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/27/20) includes that any individuals who themselves either: (a) are test-confirmed to have COVID-19; or (b) experience the symptoms of COVID-19 (listed below) must stay at home throughout the infection period, and cannot return to campus until the school system screens the individual to determine conditions for campus re-entry have been met.

Schools must close off areas that are heavily used by the individual with the test-confirmed case (student, teacher, or staff) until the non-porous surfaces in those areas can be disinfected, unless more than 7 days have passed since that person was on campus.

What about guidance for individuals who are in close contact to individuals who tested positive?

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 12/4/20) states that for individuals who are close contacts to individuals who tested positive, a 14-day stay-at-home period was previously advised by the CDC based on the incubation period of the virus. As of Dec. 2, the CDC amended its guidance to allow two shorter options for the stay at-home period.

School systems may apply any of the following stay-at-home periods to those individuals who are identified as close contacts in the absence of specific control orders issued by their local health authority regarding the identified individuals. Specifically, the stay-at-home period can be:

  • 10 days after the last close contact, so long as they continue to monitor themselves daily for symptoms and take appropriate precautions through day 14
  • 7 days after the last close contact, after receiving a negative test result (administered at least 5 days after the last close contact), so long as they continue to monitor themselves daily for symptoms and take appropriate precautions through day 14
  • For staff who are necessary to preserve school operations, school systems can choose not to require a stay-at-home period, so long as the affected staff continue to monitor themselves daily for symptoms and take appropriate precautions through day 14, and schools can consider the use of rapid tests for these individuals
  • 14 days after the last close contact

What kind of reporting requirements are there for test-confirmed cases of COVID-19?

In its 2020-21 COVID-19 Case Reporting document (updated 8/27/20), 2020-21 COVID-19 Case Reporting FAQ (updated 9/10/2), and DSHS Texas Public Schools Data Display FAQ (updated 10/1/20), TEA outlines data reporting requirements and case data dashboard information to support policymakers, districts, educators and parents making decisions on how to keep school populations healthy. TEA is supporting DSHS in conducting a statewide weekly data collection dashboard of positive COVID-19 cases in schools. Case information should be supplied each week a school system is notified that a student, teacher, staff member, district employee or other person who participates in any on-campus activity is test-confirmed with a current COVID-19 infection and exposed in close contact. On campus means on the campus grounds, on a school bus or in any campus facility.

Each school district can independently determine if it wants to publish a separate dashboard from the DSHS weekly data collection dashboard. Because the information included in a district’s dashboard is not standardized each school district can determine what type of information is collected and shared on its dashboard.

Specifically, school administrators and some other school employees, including teachers and counselors, have a duty to make a report if they suspect that a student or a staff member may have COVID-19. Failing to report may constitute a crime and could potentially lead to an investigation by the State Board for Educator Certification and sanctions against an educator’s credentials. Click here to read more.

The online web form must be submitted weekly beginning Sept. 8. According to TEA’s 2020-21 COVID-19 Case Reporting FAQ (9/2/20), a school district that has already started the 2020-21 school year will need to submit a report for on-campus positive cases at the campus level from the date the school year began. Positive antibody tests, which show an individual has COVID-19 antibodies but is not necessarily currently infected, do not require a case report, TEA said. In addition to the state COVID-19 Public School Case Report form, schools will still have to submit a separate report to their local health entity for purposes of public health actions such as contact tracing.

Separately, TEA announced a PEIMS data collection beginning in October to collect crisis codes at the student level. Together, these two data collections will allow TEA and DSHS to review statewide information on COVID-19 cases in schools to better inform public policy decisions that will continue to be made related to COVID-19.

Per TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/27/20), consistent with school notification requirements for other communicable diseases, and consistent with legal confidentiality requirements, schools must notify all teachers, staff, and families of all students in a school if a test-confirmed COVID-19 case is identified among students, teachers or staff who participate in any on-campus activities.

Is TEA making COVID-19 testing available in schools?

Yes, districts may opt into TEA's COVID-19 testing program through Jan. 15, 2021.

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 11/5/20), school systems are only eligible to receive this testing support if they are providing on-campus instruction to all of the students who wish to attend on campus, currently or within the next two weeks. If this condition cannot be met, specific authorization from TEA is required. High schools employing hybrid instruction meet the eligibility requirements to opt into the testing project.

The state will provide the rapid tests and the corresponding PPE (N95 foldable masks, face shields, gloves, gowns, and surgical masks) needed to administer the tests; however, school systems will need to provide the test administrators to perform these tests as well as manage all testing logistics.

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project Playbook (updated 10/28/20), when opting into the K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project, the school system commits to:

  • Test only district employees and/or students
  • Make testing optional
  • Obtain formal consent from student's legal guardian (for those under 18) or individual being tested (18+)
  • Not charge students/staff for testing
  • Allow all students who wish to participate in on campus instruction to do so

What determines a school district’s test distribution allotment?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (10/28/20), the distribution will be based on various factors, including the availability of testing materials received from TEA’s federal partners and the number of school systems that have chosen to participate.

The Texas Department of Emergency Management has an inventory system that school systems will be required to update weekly. Each school system will receive a monthly allotment of tests and PPE.

  • Initial allocations will be based on the number of staff and students as well as the Oct. 16 Trauma Service Region COVID-19 hospitalizations as a percent of total hospitalizations. Trauma service levels will be updated two weeks before the end of each month to determine the following month’s allocations.
  • TEA provided the Texas Department of Emergency Management with fall 2019-20 PEIMS counts which is the most recent data available at the state level. The staff counts include teaching staff, support staff, auxiliary staff, administrative staff, paraprofessional staff, auxiliary staff.
  • For allocations starting with March, school systems will be required to have reported results for a minimum of 70% of the tests previously distributed prior to receiving a new allocation.

If my school system is in a region with a high hospitalization rate, will we get more tests?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20):

  • TDEM will distribute one test per staff member per month for each school system in TSA regions with COVID-19 hospitalization percentage below 7%
  • TDEM will distribute two tests per staff member per month in TSA regions with COVID-19 hospitalization percentage at or above 7% and below 15%
  • TDEM will distribute four tests per staff member per month in TSA regions with COVID-19 hospitalization percentage at or above 15%
  • TDEM will distribute additional tests for targeted testing of symptomatic and close contact individuals on campus at 5% of total staff and student counts

Additionally, TDEM has an inventory system that school systems will be required to update weekly. Each school system will receive a monthly allotment of tests and PPE that school systems can use to administer as they see fit throughout the month

How long is this testing program slated to run?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 12/17/20), as of Jan. 15, 2021, school systems will no longer be able to opt-in to the K-12 COVID Testing Project to receive rapid tests. School systems that have already opted-in will continue to receive their allocations per the distribution methodology posted on our website. TEA urges districts to continue to use the test kits as many of the tests distributed have an expiration date, some as early as February 2021. Districts should contact TDEM if kits are set to expire. TDEM will not send additional tests to replace the expiring tests unless the district has met the resupply threshold.

What additional information is there about the BinaxNow tests that the state is using?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20) the state is using Abbott BinaxNow Ag Card Tests. These credit card-sized rapid tests can potentially be largely self-administered through a nasal swab and deliver results in 15 minutes. The test detects the presence of a specific viral antigen, which implies current viral infection. This test kit is a screening tool that identifies the presence of viral antigens (SARS-CoV-2) in the body.

The differences between an antigen, PCR and antibody test:

  • The antigen tests identify the virus by detecting the proteins from the virus.
  • The molecular test (RT-PCR) detects the virus’s genetic material to see if you have an active coronavirus infection.
  • An antibody test looks for antibodies that are made by your immune system in response to a threat.

Abbott evaluated its test in 102 patients who had shown COVID-19 symptoms for less than 7 days and compared the results with a PCR test. This analysis showed that BinaxNOW has a sensitivity (true positive rate) of 97.1% and a specificity (true negative rate) of 98.5%. The tests have an expiration date that is printed on the outside of each box of test kits.

Who is eligible to be tested using the BinaxNow test?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 11/5/20) tests are only available to a student or staff member employed by the school system, or a school board member. Permission slips for students under 18 years old are required. Sample permission slips can be found within TEA’s Public Health Orders Card, which lays out all the basic information needed to register an individual for a test.

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Studies will allow testing on asymptomatic individuals during the public health crisis.

Schools cannot mandate the use of the Abbott BinaxNow Ag Card Tests on their staff or students, including testing for their student-athletes. School systems may use the tests for students who will remain off campus learners if the school system deems it otherwise necessary. Also, schools may not charge for administering these tests.

For every positive case, a whole household is potentially affected. Please refer those individuals to the TDEM and DSHS COVID-19 Test Collection Sites Map.

What are the recommended testing approaches for the COVID-19 testing program? 

TEA outlines two recommended testing approaches, targeted testing and screening, in its K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project Playbook (updated 11/5/20):

  • Targeted Testing
    • Test administrators may conduct testing on staff or students who present symptoms of COVID-19 while on campus
    • All test administrators must receive a parental authorization form for any individual under 18 years of age to be tested
  • Screening for recurring testing of asymptomatic individuals – recommended to limit to staff only:
    • Participating districts may conduct testing on all campus staff every four weeks if the COVID-19 hospitalization rate is under 7%.
    • Participating districts may conduct testing on all campus staff every two weeks if the COVID-19 hospitalization rate is between 7% and 15%.
    • Participating districts may conduct testing on all campus staff every week if the COVID-19 hospitalization rate is at or above 15%.
    • As the local/regional COVID-19 hospitalization rate changes, the school system coordinator will be notified of any change in test frequency for their campuses for the following month.

School systems may opt to use other approaches to testing. When considering other approaches, it is not recommended to use tests:

  • Immediately prior to exposure to another group that has not been tested (e.g. testing a volleyball team prior to a game)
  • In lieu of implementing other safety protocols (e.g., allowing first grade students who have tested negative to not wear masks)
  • End a close contact stay-at-home before the incubation period has completed (e.g., allowing a teacher who was identified as a close contact to come back after 2 days with a negative test)

Each school system will, however, determine the testing strategy that will meet the needs of their schools within the following limitations:

  • All testing in school systems as a part of this program will be conducted on a voluntary basis;
  • Tests will only be conducted on staff and students of the K-12 public or private school;
  • No allocation of additional test materials and/or PPE is required beyond the monthly allocation;
  • Individuals under the age of 18 will be required to have a signed legal guardian permission slip to conduct the test;
  • All individuals conducting the testing will have complied with certain training requirements;
  • Individuals tested will not be charged for the test; and
  • All results of the tests will be reported through the app.txrapidtest.org application.

Who administers the tests?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20), only a certified test administrator is authorized to conduct the rapid ABBOTT-BinaxNow test procedure. A test administrator may be any individual identified by the local school system who completes the required training and submits all testing results as required by state and federal law.

Every test administrator will need an iPhone, iPad, or Android device to scan driver’s license information, ABBOTT-Binax Now Test QR Code, and/or manually enter additional information regarding the individual to be tested. This is a web-based portal and not an application that will need to be downloaded on a device.

Each participating school system will identify one school test coordinator to TEA. One  alternate contact is authorized to allow for continuity with the administration process.

Dr. Alex Lazar has agreed to serve as the provider of record for the BinaxNow tests in K-12. This information will be included in the data reported to DSHS on each individual’s information and test results that are entered into the portal by test administrators.

Each school system can determine the testing logistics that make the most sense for them and may contract with a third-party provider (clinic, outside vendor); however, third-party providers are not allowed to collect a fee or copay for performing these services.

What is the process for students and staff to be tested?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20):

  • Staff and students over 18 years of age may go to register.txrapidtest.org to enter the required information before testing. They will need to fill out the information required, and press submit. A QR code will be created that contains the information necessary to register. They may print out the QR Code, or take a picture on their phone to bring to the testing location. Legal guardians of students under 18 years of age may also use the QR Code generator for their children, but they must also provide a signed permission slip.
  • After the test is obtained using a sterile swab, the ABBOTT-BinaxNow Card takes 15 minutes to return a result. 
  • The ABBOTT test is a presumptive test and is only an indicator of the presence of the COVID-19 virus. A formal medical evaluation and certified laboratory verification would be necessary to indicate a confirmed infection. Presumptive-positive results also do not rule out bacterial infection or coinfection not related to COVID-19. Please refer to the consultation form provided by Abbott.
  • A faint line can indicate a presumptive positive result. Faint but still readable, results are considered to be conclusive results — positive or negative. Inconclusive results will include the blue control line not changing, only the sample line is displayed, or no line displayed at all. The test is to be re-taken and the test administrator notified of the inconclusive result.
  • The tests and used PPE are considered biohazardous material for disposal and school systems must handle used tests and PPE as a biohazard and dispose of accordingly. See TDEM Testing Support Guide for additional information.

What reporting requirements are there for these tests?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20):

  • As part of the test registration process, the individual or their guardian’s phone number and email address are entered into app.txrapidtest.org. Once the test results are put in the system by the test administrator, a text message and email are auto-generated to notify the individual.
  • There is no auto-generated report to let the school system know who and when someone tests positive. Test administrators should work with their school system test coordinator to determine if an additional process is needed.
  • School districts are required to submit the volume of any test administered and the results with the school district even if there aren’t positive cases in a given week. This information will be aggregated at the state and district level and publicly posted on the DSHS COVID-19 data page.
  • When someone tests positive at school the process will be determined at the local level. It is recommended that schools follow public health guidance from DSHS and the CDC and that any positive case be removed from the campus. People receiving a positive test should consider obtaining a more formal PCR (molecular) lab-based test.
  • All personal health information collected in registration and results will be handled under local, state and national privacy rules. Individual registration and results will only be shared with DSHS as required by law. Aggregate level information without personally identifiable information may be shared with school systems and the public. Schools are encouraged to create their own internal document to capture individuals tested and results.
  • The state does not require staff and/or students to obtain a release letter to resume on-campus activities after having either previously tested positive for COVID-19 or quarantine after close contact. Test collection sites offered by the Texas Division of Emergency Management do not issue release letters. Similarly, the Department of State Health Services and most local health departments do not provide release letters and refer to CDC return to work guidelines as the standard.

Is there information on eligibility, cost, and administration of COVID-19 vaccines?

Yes, information regarding vaccines may be found in TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ. Per the Department of State Health Services, school nurses are eligible for vaccination as part of Phase 1A. At this time, educators and school staff as a profession are NOT eligible for vaccination, however, educators and school staff who meet the eligibility requirements laid out in Phase 1B, which includes people 65 years of age and older and people 16 years of age and older with at least one chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, are eligible. If you meet the eligibility requirements, a list of vaccine providers is available on the Texas COVID-19 Vaccine Provider Location site.

The recipient of the vaccine will not be required to pay any out-of-pocket expense to obtain the vaccine. Please see the Center for Disease Control FAQ related to paying for the COVID-19 vaccine for more general information.

At this point, schools have not been identified as vaccine administration sites, and school staff are not responsible for administering vaccines.

Can a school district require an eligible educator to receive the vaccine?

The current COVID-19 vaccination process is voluntary, allowing each individual to decide whether to get the vaccine. The current COVID-19 vaccines were authorized under the FDA's Emergency Use Authorization; therefore vaccination cannot be required by employers. Once a vaccine is formally approved by the FDA, employers may choose to require employees to obtain that vaccine.

How are test results further reported?

According to TEA’s K-12 COVID-19 Testing Project FAQ (updated 10/28/20):

  • TDEM through its partner agency, Southwest Texas Regional Advisory Council , will report staff and student registration of individuals to be tested, the entering of test results, and the report of test results to DSHS.
  • The COVID-19 Case Reporting form will be updated to include questions around testing and will be publicly reported on the current Texas Public Schools COVID-19 data page.
  • School systems should work with their local health authority to support contact tracing requirements.

Is there guidance on masks/face coverings?

In its SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20), TEA states that schools are required to comply with the governor’s executive order regarding the wearing of masks. Full-face shields may be used in place of a mask to protect eyes, nose, and mouth whenever a mask is not feasible. In addition to the executive order, school systems may require the use of masks or face shields for adults or students for whom it is developmentally appropriate.

How about guidance on social distancing and class size?

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20) encourages students to practice social distancing where feasible without disrupting the educational experience. The guidance includes that in classroom spaces that allow it, districts should consider placing student desks a minimum of six feet apart when possible. In addition, in classrooms where students are regularly within six feet of one another, schools should plan for more frequent hand washing and/or hand sanitizing and should consider whether increased airflow from the outdoors is possible. When feasible and appropriate (for example, in physical education classes as weather permits), it is preferable for students to gather outside, rather than inside, because of likely reduced risk of virus spread outdoors. Moreover, depending upon local conditions, school systems should consider eliminating assemblies and other activities that bring large groupings of students and/or teachers and staff together.

A district must submit a request for a class size exception for any class in K-4 that exceeds the 22 students class size limit (Texas Education Code §25.112) during the course of the school year. This requirement applies to remote instruction in addition to on-campus instruction. For additional information please see the Maximum Class Size Exceptions section of the State Waivers website.

What about visitors to schools?

In its SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20), TEA states parents and other adults can visit schools, as permitted by local school system policies. Excluding parental drop-off and pick-up, before visitors are allowed onto campuses, school systems must screen all visitors to determine if the visitors have COVID-19 symptoms or are test-confirmed with COVID-19, and, if so, they must remain off campus until they meet certain criteria for re-entry.

During visits, parents and other visitors must follow virus prevention and mitigation requirements of the school.

School systems should restrict visits in schools to only those essential to school operations.

What about public health guidance for staffing and meetings?  

TEA’s SY 20-21 Public Health Guidance (updated 8/4/20) includes that school systems should attempt to reduce in-person staff meetings or other opportunities for adults to congregate in close settings. When those meetings are necessary and cannot be done through electronic means, everyone must follow mask protocols, remain at least 6 feet apart where feasible, consider the use of dividers, and consider whether increased airflow from the outdoors is possible in those settings.

Is the state doing anything about Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for students and staff?

Per TEA’s Personal Protective Equipment Update (updated 6/9/20), the agency, in collaboration with the Governor’s Strike Force and the Texas Department of Emergency Management, is distributing PPE to help school systems reopen for the 2020-21 school year. PPE includes:

  • Disposable masks: 53 million for students and staff
  • Reusable masks: 18 million for students and staff
  • Gloves: 12 million sets for staff
  • Thermometers (infrared and no-contact): 42,500 for students and staff
  • Hand Sanitizer: 600,000 gallons for students and staff
  • Face Shields: 1 million for staff

PPE allotments were calculated by using 2019-20 student and on-campus staff counts and were allotted on a per pupil, district basis. On-campus staff includes teachers, administrators, paraprofessionals, and auxiliary staff. Districts maintain the discretion and responsibility for distributing the PPE according to their local context.

Click here to download the 2020-21 PPE allotments by district. The list includes the PPE items as well as the product types per PPE.

Is there guidance for UIL sports?

The UIL has postponed the start of the high school fall sports season for Class 6A and 5A football and volleyball teams with practices for the two sports in the organization’s highest classifications will start five weeks later: Sept. 7, rather than Aug. 3. Volleyball teams can start games Sept. 14; football, Sept. 24.

Each sport will still play a full season with football playoffs starting in early December and extend through January 2021, rather than ending before Christmas. The volleyball state tournament is set for Dec. 11-12, rather than just before Thanksgiving.

The UIL will permit schools in Class 4A and below to start on-time for all fall sports: football, volleyball, cross country and team tennis. State championships for the smallest four classifications will remain in the traditional time frame.

Updated UIL Risk Mitigation Guidelines took effect Aug. 1.

Is there guidance on training and conditioning activities that are non-UIL activities?

TEA’s Training and Conditioning Guidance for Non-UIL Activities (updated 6/9/20), provides information on facilities, grouping and staffing, and hygiene/health practices. Per the guidance, workouts and training sessions on campus must be optional for students. In addition to on-campus workout options, schools should consider providing students guidance for working out at home or remotely away from school. This can include virtual workouts and training, emailed or otherwise electronically delivered instructions, or any delivery model approved by the local school district.

For grouping students:

  • Sport Specific Activities Conducted Outdoors: Students may be placed in working groups no larger than 15 total students, through June 21. Beginning June 22, students may be placed in working groups no larger than 25 students total. Each working group should maintain appropriate distance from other working groups.
  • Sport Specific Activities Conducted Indoors: Students may be placed in working groups no larger than 10 total students, through June 21. Beginning June 22, students may be placed in working groups no larger than 15 students total. Each working group should maintain appropriate distance from other working groups.

Indoor workout activities can be conducted up to a maximum of 25% capacity through June 21 and may begin operating at 50% capacity beginning June 22.

Schools should limit the total number of participants based on available space to allow for the appropriate distancing between students and staff.

When actively exercising or playing a wind instrument, students and coaches must maintain at least 10 feet of distance from all sides when possible.