In response to recent tragedies such as the Santa Fe ISD shooting in 2018, Gov. Greg Abbott and House and Senate committees worked throughout the interim to develop recommendations for how to address and prevent such situations, particularly in schools. Several bills have already been filed (including a number that more generally related to mental health issues, which are not included in the list below) and many more are expected before the March deadline for filing bills.

SB 406  Birdwell, Brian

Allows a school marshal to carry a concealed handgun and store it in a locked and secured location aside from the currently-required locked and secured safe.

SB 117  Creighton, Brandon

Specifies that current law regarding the illegal possession of a firearm on a school or postsecondary institution or other grounds on which a sponsored activity is being held applies to grounds and buildings owned by and under the control of the school or postsecondary institution.         

SB 243  Creighton, Brandon

Removes the specificity in current law regarding how and where a school marshal can store a handgun so that the gun can be carried or can be stored in a place other than a locked and secured safe within immediate reach.

SB 244  Creighton, Brandon

Allows school boards to appoint more than one school marshal for each campus.

SB 500   Nelson, Jane

Authorizes supplemental appropriations for the current biennium, including $100 million for school safety measures such as exterior doors with push bars, metal detectors, vehicle barriers, security systems and campus-wide shooter alarm systems.

SB 193  Perry, Charles

Requires DPS to waive certain concealed handgun license fees for school marshals.

HB 257  Blanco, Cesar

Provides that a district or charter school participating in the school marshal program must provide area law enforcement with information, which must otherwise remain confidential, including a list of campuses with a marshal and the identity of each marshal.         

HB 973  Metcalf, Will

Requires the Texas School Safety Center to report to TEA if a district does not properly develop and implement a multihazard emergency operations plan, establish a school safety and security committee, report results of a safety and security audit, or provide information regarding a memorandum of understanding it has entered with mutual aid entities. TEA may impose administrative penalties on a district up to the amount of the superintendent's annual salary.

HB 974  Metcalf, Will

Revises current law requiring school safety and security audits so that the audit must be held every two years rather than three. Provides that districts must require any person entering a campus, except to attend an open-to-the-public school event, to display ID, and must verify whether such persons are on the sex offender registry.

HB 975  Metcalf, Will

Requires school board trustees to complete school safety training.        

HB 976  Metcalf, Will

Specifies that school board trustees and members of a charter school governing body must complete school safety and security training at least once every three years. Requires charter schools to conform to state statutes regarding school safety matters. Requires districts to appoint an emergency management coordinator and establish at least one threat assessment team.         

HB 1009  Metcalf, Will

Specifies that current law regarding the illegal possession of a firearm on a school or postsecondary institution or other grounds on which a sponsored activity is being held applies to grounds and buildings owned by and under the control of the school or postsecondary institution.

HB 797  Thierry, Shawn

Requires the installation and use of walk-through or handheld metal detectors at all buildings of a campus at each accessible entrance.

HB 1042  Toth, Steve

Requires all law enforcement agencies to develop a plan for coordinating with other law enforcement and first responders in school active shooter situations.